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Eliminate taps in Apps

I've come across a really interesting article by Luke Wroblewski, titled "Eliminating Taps with Fluid Touch Gestures", which talks about a move away from tap-based gestures in favour of new modes of gestures, suc has "Drag & Release" to complement existing ones such as swipes. The article was a particular jab at how many apps still rely on multiple taps to achieve a single goal, as Apple Maps does in it's app:

The interface requires the user to tap three times to get to their destination, as illustrated above. (source: http://goo.gl/HAF9OV)

The interface requires the user to tap three times to get to their destination, as illustrated above. (source: http://goo.gl/HAF9OV)

To streamline this process, we could use the floating action button pattern from Android’s Material Design. With this approach, you tap on search to reveal your most likely destinations then tap again on where you want to go. While some tasks (like getting directions home or to a recent destination) are made easier, others like search now require a bit more work (two taps instead of one).
— Luke Wroblewski (http://goo.gl/HAF9OV)

In fact, using what Luke terms fluid touch, you can enhance the floating action by using a drag gesture, to cut down the number of taps required, by pressing the home button, then sliding your finger up to select a menu item. This concept can also very well be applied on slide in from left menu items, where you don't have to let go of your index finder, and instead move to a selected menu item. 

By dragging with your index finger, from selection you can select a menu item in a more elegant and engaging manner.(source: http://goo.gl/HAF9OV)

By dragging with your index finger, from selection you can select a menu item in a more elegant and engaging manner.(source: http://goo.gl/HAF9OV)

I took extra interest in this UX shift, which is inspired by Android's Material Design UX framework, because it applies even more to the newer iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus devices, which have substantially larger screens. Because we can't use one hand to navigate easily on our new and larger devices, emphasising swipes and gestures over taps is even more imperative. Having the home button on the bottom-right side, also allows users to access the button without having to stretch excessively to reach the top part of the screen.

In fact, the whole notion of having menu items on the top part of the screen should be eventually deprecated, or re-conceptualised, in my view. 

 

Luke's article is quite interesting, and I urge you to have a look at:
http://goo.gl/HAF9OV